The Music of Fairies, Druids, Spirits (and more)

Throughout history, in every culture, there have been tales and legends about supernatural music, the music of fairies, spirits, music with powers to enchant, heal, charm, mystify and cause mischief.

We have prepared 2 collections of such tunes.
The first collection is 3 PDF files as
music notation
The second collection is a collection of tunes in Mp3 format.

The music notation making up these collections was gathered from many antique books that include notated examples of this music.





1. Music of the Fairies
music notation

Note: The music notation in this first PDF is the basic melodies of these tunes as presented in the antique books and are of course perfect for interpretation and improvisation.

PDF -1

Irish Fairy Songs
3 Irish Fairy Songs
Music Heard Played By A Fairy


Shetland Fairy Tunes

Aith Rant
West Side Trows Reel
Winyadepla
A Fairy Reel
Hylta Dance (trowie tune from Fetlar)
VallaField

Banshee Wail 1 & 2

Druid Song

Bridget Cruise - 4 Settings

2 Swedish "Neck" Songs

3 Welsh Fairy Tunes

Songs from the "Shieling"
The Shieling Song
An Toman Cuilnn - Shieling Fairy Song


Random Celtic Fairy Tunes
(Said to have been learned from the Sidhe)
The Gold Ring
Pretty Maid Milking the Cow
Cutting Ferns
The Bright Dawn of Day
A Fairy Lullaby
Dawn Fairy Song

African Spirit Songs
Akele Wood Spirits
Ogbuka Wood Spirits
Asaba Forest Spirit
African Spirit Song
African Spirit Song 2


Fairy Music of Scotland
Water-Kelpie's Lullaby
A Fairy's Love Song
Sealwoman's Sea Joy
A Fairy Plaint
An Ancient Tune Used To Attract Seals
Crodh Chailein - Daoine-sith (Mound Dwellers) song

 

PDF 2

The 2nd PDF is made up of four sections:
1. "Suantree" (sleep music).
2. Music used to charm animals.
3. Music said to have been learned from the fairies.
4, Traditional tunes about fairies, elves, and leprechauns.
For these arrangements we have included as above, the
notation for the tune itself but also with a basic guitar part with chord names.

As with the first collection above, all of these tunes
were found through research into various antique books and collections.
Note:
A few of the tunes below are also included in the first collection above, but in this PDF we have included the guitar chords and with some a more detailed description of the tunes.

Part 1 - Suantree
The ' Sleep -music' (Suantree) was intended to produce sleep; and
the tunes belonging to this style were plaintive and soothing.


Suantree 1
Suantree 2
A unique song in this class of music is: Dream Angus
Ancient Lullaby
A Fairy Lullaby

 

Part 2 - Tunes Used To Charm Animals.

Women of the fairy race were said to milk the deer on the mountain tops, charming them with songs composed to a fairy melody . One of these songs is said to be the famous "Crodh Chailein." People said that the deer, and also milking cows gave their milk freely under the spell of melodic enchantment and would also be seen to be quite uncomfortable if the song was interrupted.
At milking time girls would often chant a particular sort of air, in a soft, gentle voice. These milking tunes had the effect of soothing the cows and of making them submit more gently to be milked.
Ploughmen would often whistle a sweet, slow, melody, which had a powerful effect in soothing the horses.
There were also tunes used by shepherds while herding sheep, those who herded cattle and "horse whisperers".

Dairymaid's Croon
Far from Home
(A tune heard by shepherd whistling to a large herd of sheep)
Herdsman's Song
Milking Croon.
Shepherd's Call
The Dairy Maid's Song
Lochaber No More
Crodh Chailein
Flower of The Forest

A shieling (Scottish Gaelic: àirigh), also spelt sheiling is a hut, or collection of huts, once common in a wild or lonely place in the hills and mountains of Scotland and northern England.
People often put milk out for the fairies at the sheiling. Fairies used to be seen dancing around a fire.
The shelters were often used used by people tending cattle on high or remote ground, pasture land for the grazing of cattle in summer.

An Toman Cuilnn - Sheiling Fairy Song
An Island Sheiling Song

Part 3 - New Fairy Tunes



Luathradawn's Jig

The story is that the tune came directly from a Luathradawn, a Leprechaun type character (a fairy or a small hump-backed man).

The Trowie Burn
Da Trowie Spring

Trowie is a Scottish name for a type of fairy.
These 2 songs are said to be Trowie songs.

A Fairy Plaint
Said to have been learned from the fairies.

Crarae
Crarae is a village on the banks of Loch Fyne in Argyll and Bute, on the west coast of Scotland known for a megalithic ruin known as the ‘Fairy Knowe’.

Cutting Ferns
There is a tale of a young lady who went out to cut fern , and fell in love with one of the Sidhe, or fairy folk. The fairy also fell in love, but when her family did not approve and they kept her at home. This melody is from a song sung by the fairy, who was broken-hearted.

The Gold Ring
There is a legend of a piper who had the courage to spend a night hiding near a fairy rath to listen to the wonderful music of the little folk.

Fairy Song Heard At Dawn
Said to have been learned from the fairies.

Flowers Of The Forest
Said to have been learned from the fairies.

The Gravel Walk
He tells of a man who knew only two tunes before being aided by the fairies, after which he had a vast repertoire;

Idlewild
This is said to be a ‘fairy tune’ a musician had learned one lonely night while walking home.

John MacAnanty's Welcome Home
Macananty or Macanantan was is said to have been a fairy king who formerly enjoyed much fame in Ireland.

Red Haired Boy
A man and his brother were gathering seaweed at Faill an Mhada Rua when they heard beautiful ethereal music nearby; He followed the sounds up the cliff and was later able to remember the melody.

More of Cloyne
It is said that More was the guardian fairy of Cloyne in Cork.

Heather Wind
It was considered that a ‘heathery breeze’ was a kind of fairy wind, an isolated strong wind that can “root up the grasses out of the ground,”. There is also folklore that says that vegetables grew better in the soil where heather grows and that it is also an excellent area to find a shamrock.

Part 4 - Music About Fairies,
Elves and Leprecahuns

Fairy Dance Reel
The Leprechaun's Favorite
Fairy Lamentation
A Fairy's Love Song
The Knockard Elf
The Fairie's Hornpipe
The Fairy Hillock
The Fairy Reel
The Leprechaun Step
The Wee Man from Skye
The Fairy Cobbler
The Fairy Rath



PDF 3
Arranged for melody, guitar (with chord names, harp and drone.
"The Piper's Cave"


There is in Scotland a family of hereditary bagpipers whose name is Macruimean (or M'Crimmon). Now, it is well known how it came to pass that the famous bagpiper, Macruimean, got his fine music. He was ploughing one day near a haunted hill, when one of the "Little Folks," a tiny green man, came up and invited him into the mountain. After they had entered a cave, the tiny green man gave Macruimean an exquisitely fine bagpipe, and told him that so long as any part of the instrument remained, either with him or with his offspring they would continue to be the best bagpipers in Scotland. When the lucky Macruimean had arrived with his bagpipe at his house, he found to his surprise that he could play upon it beautifully any tune which occurred to his mind. Indeed, his performance was so powerful and impressive that it astonished every one; and the people in the Highlands have still the saying, Co ard ri Piob mhoir Mic-Chruimean,—("As loud as Macruimean's pipes.")

There is also still in the Highlands a cave called Uamh na'm Piobairean—i.e., "The Piper's Cave," into which the famous Macruimean with his children used to repair to practise the bagpipe. This cave is on the top of a brae, or rising ground, eight miles north from Dunvegan Castle. Even his daughters, people say, would occasionally steal to the cave, if they could lay hold on their father's favourite set of pipes, and indulge in a vigorous practice for an hour or so. Moreover, at what time the Macruimean family was first established as the hereditary bagpipers of the Lairds of MacLeod, no one can say now; for it was so very long ago.

(from a 19th century book by Carl Engel).



Downloading the 3 fairy music PDFS


You can purchase the 3 Music of the Fairies notation PDFs using Paypal or a Credit card for $6.00 at the following link:

Music of The Fairies - 3 PDFs $6.00

After your secure payment is processed you will immediately be sent download links to the email you give while purchasing the collection.

2. Music of the Fairies
Mp3 collection

We have also prepared a collection of selected tunes in as MP3 files for those who do not read music notation to be able to learn some of these tunes.

Note: As in the case of the above, these Mp3 files are samples of the basic melodies of these tunes as presented in the antique books and are of course perfect for interpretation and improvisation.

Included in this collection:

A Fairy Lullaby

A Song To Attract Seals - MP3

Banshee Song
Banshee Song 2
Banshee Song
Bright Dawn Of Day
Cutting Ferns
Dawn Of Day
Fairy Music
Fairy Song
Fariy Dance version 2


FariyDance1 - Mp3

Flowers_Of_The_Forest
HarpTree
Herbridian Milking Song
IrishFairySong1
IrishFairySong1b
Milking Croon
Pretty Girl Milking A Cow 1
Shetland Fairy Tune
Soothing Croon
SwedishNeckSong1
SwedishNeckSong2
The Sheiling Song
TheGoldRing
Welsh Fairy Song 1


Welsh Fairy Song 2 - MP3

Welsh Fairy Song 3


You can purchase the Music of the Fairies Mp3s using Paypal or a Credit card for $5.00 at the following link:

Mp3 Music of The Fairies - $5.00

The MP3 collection is in the form of 2 "zip" files. After your secure payment is processed you will immediately be sent download links to the email you give while purchasing the collection.


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